SnS on Gen 6: The Top PS2/GC/XBox/DC Games According To SnS

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Re: SnS on Gen 6: The Top PS2/GC/XBox/DC Games According To SnS

Postby No. » Wed Aug 03, 2016 2:50 am

Better ultra late than ultra never for me!

31. Okami (PS2)
Okami was a graphical treat. It played as beautifully as it looked, and while some people will deride it as a Zelda clone, it's one of the finest clones out there because of its style and nicely done gimmick.

30. Dynamite Cop (Dreamcast)
Back when I was a kid, this game was pretty damn fun. It was a beat up in which you used certain things in the environment to fight your enemies in addition to your fists such as...hair spray and frozen tuna! The QTEs in the game were actually pretty good in that if you failed them, you didn't get a game over instead you would just fight extra enemies or have slightly lower health.

29. Rez (PS2)
Rez was interesting in that it was a fairly trippy experience despite being a rail shooter. Normally I don't play too many on rail shooters but this one was pretty fun to play through overall. I'll always be fond of Stage 5's stage music.

28. Kingdom Under Fire: The Crusaders (Xbox)
KUF is a rare example of a real time strategy game actually being done pretty well on a console game. It was a pretty unknown game when the series first popped up on the PC, but due to its unexpected popularity with this entry it actually did pretty well, I really wish they didn't go with a hack and slash direction of the most recent one through.

27. Growlanser: Wayfarer of Time (PS2)
This is the best Growlanser out there compared to all the rest of them, I enjoyed that it was a bit of a political story aside from all the magical stuff that was occurring in it.

26. Suikoden 3 (PS2)
I have a slight hate and love relationship with this Suikoden out of the others due to the way that some parts of the combat was handled, but it was my first Suikoden game and I genuinely felt that the story was enjoyable enough even as a first time Suikoden player, plus I enjoyed that there was three main characters that you get to explore their stories and their circumstances.

25. Breakdown (Xbox)
Breakdown was fairly unique at the time, it was an FPS that was more focused on your ability to fight your enemies with your fists and you were constantly in first person the entire time of the game. It’s like Half-Life, but instead of playing around with physics and shit, you get to punch shit in the face instead!

24. Persona 3 (PS2)
Persona 3 was the first persona game I really got into, but I really enjoyed this spinoff of the SMT series. What it did pretty well was that it gave you a way to relax or speak to characters in ways that kept you going to fully get their stories. In addition, the game’s battle system was pretty nice, I liked that the AI did a pretty decent job of fighting the enemies themselves.

23. Valkyrie Profile 2: Silmeria (PS2)
Silmeria is a really good follow up to the first Valkyrie Profile, as it did a really good job of translating the combat from the first game into 3D. The story wasn’t as good as the first one, but it still had plenty of great moments occur in the game. I really hope they get around to making a Valkyrie Profile: Hrist at some point.

22. Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic 2 (Xbox, PC)
As far as WRPGs go, this one was a much more interesting RPG than its predecessor with its grayer take on the Force. It wasn't like other Star Wars games with just Light and Dark Sides duking it out with each other as usual, KOTOR2 was a lot more personal than that. Plus the added variety in builds (Why yes, I can go certainly go Kung Fu Jedi if I so chose :D) combined with the far more interesting characters you encountered makes this sequel better than the original.

21. Fire Emblem: Path of Radiance (GC)
I'm a big fan of this Fire Emblem in particular because it's a more...epic adventure than the other Fire Emblems on the GBA as I thought the story was pretty well done, as Ike is more of a mercenary than a noble and that there was more to the story than just a mercenary helps a princess take back her kingdom from the evil empire.


20. Ace Combat 5: The Unsung War (PS2)
Ace Combat has always been one of my favorite series, and this one is pretty exceptional because it expands on AC4’s design to make some pretty fun missions compared to 4. I also enjoyed that you were able to have your wingmen use different aircraft along with some of their personalities. But for me personally, the highlight of AC5 was its missions because they were full of variety in them.

19. Ace Combat Zero: The Belkan War (PS2)
Zero compared to 5 was a bit more grim in terms of its scope. It’s a prologue to 5, but I feel that Zero does a good enough job to stand on in its own right. It has an alignment system which I thought was pretty interesting, and Zero was also host to the best wingman in the AC series. I also felt that the grimmer story present in Zero made things a lot more interesting than with 5.

18. Eternal Darkness (GC)
Eternal Darkness was a game I was really hyped for and it did really a good job of being creepy without being completely in your face about it. The sanity effects were quite unique and I really wish other horror games had studied and used this mechanic more often along with the rest of the game playing damn well. I really wish SK had made more of these type of games honestly.

17. Ace Combat 4: Shattered Skies (PS2)
Shattered Skies was the first Ace Combat on the PS2, and out the Ace Combats this was the one that actually give me some feels compared to the others.

16. Metroid Prime (GC)
A lot of people were skeptical of whether or not Metroid could make it in 3D, but not I. I was looking forward to it heavily the first day it was announced. When I managed to actually play it, it lived up to my expectations a lot. What I really enjoyed about MP in addition to the combat was that they made exploring feel pretty reward with all details and the lore of the planet you can find out on your own, so it did a good job in making you feel like an actual hunter trying to get use to the environment around them.

15. Suikoden 5 (PS2)
Suikoden 5 was the last of the mainline Suikodens and I really felt like they did a really good job with this one. Some people will say that Suikoden 5 is just a redoing of the 2nd Suikoden, but I enjoyed this one more than the previous Suikodens because it stands well enough as a game on its own. Despite its slow start, once it gets started it doesn’t let go as far as I’m concerned.

14. Shin Megami Tensei 3: Nocturne (PS2)
SMT3 is one of the best RPGs on the PS2, not only was it a nice change from most RPGs in that the normal strategies from most RPGs didn’t work as well in it such as debuffs being actually important during boss battles, it also had a really nice design and soundtrack. The story itself was one of the most interesting compared to most other RPGs as the world was already destroyed but it’s up to you to shape how the new world will be.

13. Resident Evil 4 (GC)
Resident Evil 4 is a perfect example of streamlining done right. The controls felt a lot smoother than other RE games in the past, add to that the amount of camp and puns in the game made this RE a damn fun and humorous experience as far as I was concerned.

12. Ninja Gaiden (Xbox)
I never played the old Ninja Gaiden, so I considered playing the remake a treat. The combat was silky smooth and it was quite challenging to play through, it pulled no punches with ya. This game and the Devil May Cry games are the best experiences of action gaming goodness back in the PS2/Xbox/GC/DC generation.

11. Legend of Zelda: Wind Waker (GC)
When Wind Waker was first announced a lot of people derided it for its graphical style, but it made the game a lot more stylish then if they had gone with a more realistic look. The game itself was a damn fine experience on the seas and the story was told fairly well in this Zelda game.

10. Dragon Quest 8 (PS2)
Every so often I fell into a bit of a slump whenever JRPGs are concerned back in this generation. This game felt like the old school JRPGs of past generations, it had a long spiraling adventure with really excellent music. The characters were also quite enduring as well, they were quite fun to play with. Sometimes just going back to the basics was refreshing enough for it to be a new experience for me personally.

9. Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Eater
Snake Eater was a damn fine addition to the Metal Gear series, I really enjoyed it when they added in the camo system. The story was one of the best told in the Metal Gear series as far as I was concerned because it felt like a normal spy story gone horribly wrong.

8. Unreal Tournament (DC)
Unreal Tournament was one of the reasons I got into doing more and more online gaming, the port on the Dreamcast was pretty well done despite lacking an MP mode. I made a lot of memories on UT, it was a pretty good experience.

7. Grandia 2 (DC)
Like one of the characters in the game would say, it’s deep fried JRPG goodness. The story was pretty cliché, but the characters were enjoyable enough that it didn’t really matter that the story wasn’t really original. Plus the awesome combat system led it to be a good enough experience that I just had to keep on playing it till I couldn’t play it anymore.

6. Skies of Arcadia: Legends (GC)
SoA is one of my favorite RPGs ever, I really loved the theme of exploration that was constantly present through the game. One of the other things I genuinely enjoyed about SoA was that the cast felt very nicely written in combination with the story. Vyse for example was a great example of a hero who was fearlessly optimistic without being completely obnoxious. I also enjoyed the ship battles and the combat system in general, I really wish that Sega would give this game a chance again.

5. Devil May Cry 3: Dante’s Awakening (PS2)
DMC3 is perhaps my favorite example of when players and developers can work together to make a game that will rock the house. After the 2nd DMC almost killed off the DMC series, the 3rd was made from input from veteran players and devs that were listening to these suggestions. The result was a game that has one of the best action game combat systems of all time as you can literally make any kind of combo you want to make. Combine that with a return to form with Dante giving out the usual smack talk to bosses and you got yourself a damn great game that was made by the players, for the players.

4. God Hand (PS2)
God Hand was a weird as hell game when I played through it, but I always recognized the charm that it showed off. The game allowed you to make your own move set and allowed you to go through a variety of stages. To me, this was Clover Games’ best game because they decided to go balls to the wall with how much camp was in this game.

3. Devil May Cry (PS2)
DMC was the game that basically gave me a reason to get a PS2 in the first place. What it did very well, was that it was unlike most other games at the time in that it pretty much oozed style all over the place. It’s so high on my list because the style and the confidence it showed off was a great example of a game that brought about a new standard in action gaming as far as I’m concerned.

2. Return to Castle Wolfenstein (PC, Xbox, PS2)
RTCW was one of my favorite shooters, especially in terms of multiplayer. For me, this was the game that justified actually having Xbox Live. I made a lot of memories with this game in particular, I still remember the times in which my teammates/friends would gang up on someone with just knives and it was just a classic experience. The SP campaign was pretty well as well, not enough people give it credit in my personal opinion, but it was the MP that did it for me because of the way that classes were all balanced but they were all distinct in their own way and that’s something that no other MP shooter has ever be able to replicate in their design.

1. Phantasy Star Online
Without this game, I probably wouldn’t be here! PSO was a great game for its time and it still stands up to a certain degree even today. The most enduring thing about PSO was its tagline of “You’re not the only hero” which was a representation of the community in PSO was from all around the world, and while it’s a shame that Sega today no longer cares about the international side of the PS community, I will always remember PSO for what it had brought to the table and what it did for online gaming in general. This game was also my gateway into just interacting with online communities in general.
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Re: SnS on Gen 6: The Top PS2/GC/XBox/DC Games According To SnS

Postby Crono Maniac » Wed Aug 03, 2016 3:27 pm

Version with HTML tags (for Rhete)

Spoiler: show
20. Sonic Adventure 2

What people miss from the Adventure games is the sincerity. Sonic Adventure 2 is a <i>really</i> dumb videogame, but it believes so wholeheartedly in itself and its vision that it’s hard not to like it.

19. Project Inthri 2

It’s a blast to play in its own right, and it’s cool to see the threads that would eventually make their way into great games like Project Inthri 3 and Hunters.<br /><br />

<a href=”http://www.inconsequentialexistence.com/projectinthri2.htm”>Play Project Inthri 2 here.</a>

18. Grandia II

I blazed through this game in four or five days and had an absolute blast. I love all the little episodic stories in the first half, and the dark turns later on in the story are really engaging.

17. The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker

It’s hard not to be endeared to a game when it nails its very beginning and its very end, no matter what faults lie in the middle. “I coveted that wind, I suppose.”

16. The Adventures of MikeMan 2

Rhete’s made a ton of rad games! This is the first one. It has killer comic timing, and you can really see its DNA in his later work (especially with the ridiculous escalating climax).<br /><br />

<a href=”http://www.inconsequentialexistence.com/aom2.htm”>Play The Adventure of MikeMan 2 here.</a>

15. Silent Hill 3

There's something inscrutable about Silent Hill 3. It's less inventive and affecting than its predecessors, but I don't have my head wrapped around it in quite the same way as with those games. It's the only one of the bunch that gave me nightmares, and that kinda scares me even now.<br /><br />

Maybe it’s 'cause it's the hardest of the three. Or the stirring intro. Or the protagonist that isn't a milquetoast white dude. Or "they look like monsters to you?"<br /><br />

Silent Hill 3's predecessors are laser-focused, that's what makes them masterpieces. But in a way, 3's lack of precision makes it more mysterious and ethereal than those games. For that, the game is important to me.

14. Touhou 08: Imperishable Night

No other shmups craft bullet patterns as expressive and lovely as the Touhou games', and Imperishable Night is one of the best of the bunch. A favorite set-piece early on is during the second boss fight, when the lights turn off and you can only see in a small circle around your character. The game is full of amazing touches like that, right up to its last moments.

13. Seiklus

"In Seiklus, you can practically smell the sunshine," as a friend said. The game brims with human warmth. It was a tiny revolution, put together in just six months in Game Maker and released in 2003, when these kinds of personal, stripped-down videogames weren't as common. There's no death and no violence. All it asks is for you develop a relationship with its world.<br /><br />

<a href=”http://www.autofish.net/clysm/art/video_games/seiklus/”>Play Seiklus here.</a>

12. Katamari Damacy

What a joyous videogame. It feels like it sprung into existence fully-formed, there isn't a single piece of it that's out of place.

11. Metal Gear Solid 2

An End of Evangelion-level recontextualization of its predecessors, and a middle finger to their more close-minded fans. Birthed an entire generation of people Thinking Really Hard About Videogames.

10. Sonic Adventure

Sonic 2 pushed the limits of what the first game's conceptual framework was capable of, and Sonic 3 & Knuckles shoved them as far as they could possibly go. After the three Genesis games there was nothing left for the series to say, not without drastically reinventing itself. So, after largely taking the Saturn era off, that's exactly what it did.<br /><br />

Can a game succeed solely on the strengths of its holistic vision, its artistic conscience, its open heart? How much can it resonate when all its individual pieces are assembled so clumsily? A lot as it turns out, at least for me. Sonic Adventure is a mess, but a precise mess, and it's a story I'm glad to have experienced.

9. Half-Life 2

The most influential aspect of the Half-Life games will always be their presentation. The games told a story in a way that was totally unlike other releases at the time, and that narrative flow is what makes the games stick in our minds even today. You can see their influence in all kinds of work, from big-budget titles to single-person jam projects. You'll likely continue seeing that influence for many, many years to come.

8. Shadow of the Colossus

One of the medium's handful of genuine great tragedies. Wanderer poisons his body and slaughters beautiful creatures on his quest. The only way to stop him from doing so is to turn the game off, to quit playing. As long as you’re guiding Wanderer, he will never quit, it's not something he's capable of. That steadfast determination leads to the game's ugly, inevitable, ever-so-slightly hopeful, and unforgettable conclusion.

7. Metroid Prime

I actually hated this game my first time through. It's so different tonally from its 2D predecessors -- Tallon IV is more beautiful than terrifying, and exploring the planet is more meditative than claustrophobic. A game like Super Metroid, while open, is still full of momentum and drama. In contrast Prime is full of backtracking and runs three or four times as long.<br /><br />

It clicked once I realized Metroid Prime wasn't trying to be like Super Metroid. It's its own story, one that has more in common with Nausicaa than Aliens. Ultimately, Samus isn't there to survive Tallon IV. She's there to protect it.

6. Metal Gear Solid 3

There’re so many different ways to play this game! As a kid I’d have fun just hanging out in the same areas, poking around, figuring out all the fun little ways I could interact with the environment and its enemies.

5. Cave Story

For whatever reason, whenever I think of Cave Story I think of that first climb up the island's outer wall. Maybe it's the loaded choice that comes right before it. Or the subtle revelation about the nature of the game's setting. Let's face it, it's probably <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q09KoR7g018">the song</a>.

4. Persona 4

A murder-mystery about truths both grand and personal. It's one of the most intimate games ever, introducing you to an immediately endearing cast and examining every layer of their psyches.

3. Ikaruga

Ikaruga made me realize that "video-gamey" games could still tell layered, resonant stories. It's a twenty minute long shmup with no text outside of chapter titles (at least in the GameCube version), with razor-sharp level design and the smartest approach to shooting in the genre. It also serves as a lovely little reincarnation allegory that only gets more moving the more you stew on it. It's an eternal videogame.

2. Silent Hill 2

This game was the first time I seriously engaged with subtext and what a story has to say. It's a beautiful experience, one that still resonates with me deeply.

1. Breath of Fire: Dragon Quarter

Perfect and holistic. As self-assured in its design as games like Ikaruga and Tetris. One of the best games I’ve ever played, and one of my favorite stories.<br /><br />

(I haven't played any of the other Breath of Fire games, but seeing as their fans tend to hate Dragon Quarter I probably never will wholly out of spite.)

Version with BBCode (for forum readers)

Spoiler: show
20. Sonic Adventure 2

What people miss from the Adventure games is the sincerity. Sonic Adventure 2 is a really dumb videogame, but it believes so wholeheartedly in itself and its vision that it’s hard not to like it.

19. Project Inthri 2

It’s a blast to play in its own right, and it’s cool to see the threads that would eventually make their way into great games like Project Inthri 3 and Hunters.

Play Project Inthri 2 here.

18. Grandia II

I blazed through this game in four or five days and had an absolute blast. I love all the little episodic stories in the first half, and the dark turns later on in the story are really engaging.

17. The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker

It’s hard not to be endeared to a game when it nails its very beginning and its very end, no matter what faults lie in the middle. “I coveted that wind, I suppose.”

16. The Adventures of MikeMan 2

Rhete’s made a ton of rad games! This is the first one. It has killer comic timing, and you can really see its DNA in his later work (especially with the ridiculous escalating climax).

Play The Adventure of MikeMan 2 here.

15. Silent Hill 3

There's something inscrutable about Silent Hill 3. It's less inventive and affecting than its predecessors, but I don't have my head wrapped around it in quite the same way as with those games. It's the only one of the bunch that gave me nightmares, and that kinda scares me even now.

Maybe it’s 'cause it's the hardest of the three. Or the stirring intro. Or the protagonist that isn't a milquetoast white dude. Or "they look like monsters to you?"

Silent Hill 3's predecessors are laser-focused, that's what makes them masterpieces. But in a way, 3's lack of precision makes it more mysterious and ethereal than those games. For that, the game is important to me.

14. Touhou 08: Imperishable Night

No other shmups craft bullet patterns as expressive and lovely as the Touhou games', and Imperishable Night is one of the best of the bunch. A favorite set-piece early on is during the second boss fight, when the lights turn off and you can only see in a small circle around your character. The game is full of amazing touches like that, right up to its last moments.

13. Seiklus

"In Seiklus, you can practically smell the sunshine," as a friend said. The game brims with human warmth. It was a tiny revolution, put together in just six months in Game Maker and released in 2003, when these kinds of personal, stripped-down videogames weren't as common. There's no death and no violence. All it asks is for you develop a relationship with its world.

Play Seiklus here.

12. Katamari Damacy

What a joyous videogame. It feels like it sprung into existence fully-formed, there isn't a single piece of it that's out of place.

11. Metal Gear Solid 2

An End of Evangelion-level recontextualization of its predecessors, and a middle finger to their more close-minded fans. Birthed an entire generation of people Thinking Really Hard About Videogames.

10. Sonic Adventure

Sonic 2 pushed the limits of what the first game's conceptual framework was capable of, and Sonic 3 & Knuckles shoved them as far as they could possibly go. After the three Genesis games there was nothing left for the series to say, not without drastically reinventing itself. So, after largely taking the Saturn era off, that's exactly what it did.

Can a game succeed solely on the strengths of its holistic vision, its artistic conscience, its open heart? How much can it resonate when all its individual pieces are assembled so clumsily? A lot as it turns out, at least for me. Sonic Adventure is a mess, but a precise mess, and it's a story I'm glad to have experienced.

9. Half-Life 2

The most influential aspect of the Half-Life games will always be their presentation. The games told a story in a way that was totally unlike other releases at the time, and that narrative flow is what makes the games stick in our minds even today. You can see their influence in all kinds of work, from big-budget titles to single-person jam projects. You'll likely continue seeing that influence for many, many years to come.

8. Shadow of the Colossus

One of the medium's handful of genuine great tragedies. Wanderer poisons his body and slaughters beautiful creatures on his quest. The only way to stop him from doing so is to turn the game off, to quit playing. As long as you’re guiding Wanderer, he will never quit, it's not something he's capable of. That steadfast determination leads to the game's ugly, inevitable, ever-so-slightly hopeful, and unforgettable conclusion.

7. Metroid Prime

I actually hated this game my first time through. It's so different tonally from its 2D predecessors -- Tallon IV is more beautiful than terrifying, and exploring the planet is more meditative than claustrophobic. A game like Super Metroid, while open, is still full of momentum and drama. In contrast Prime is full of backtracking and runs three or four times as long.

It clicked once I realized Metroid Prime wasn't trying to be like Super Metroid. It's its own story, one that has more in common with Nausicaa than Aliens. Ultimately, Samus isn't there to survive Tallon IV. She's there to protect it.

6. Metal Gear Solid 3

There’re so many different ways to play this game! As a kid I’d have fun just hanging out in the same areas, poking around, figuring out all the fun little ways I could interact with the environment and its enemies.

5. Cave Story

For whatever reason, whenever I think of Cave Story I think of that first climb up the island's outer wall. Maybe it's the loaded choice that comes right before it. Or the subtle revelation about the nature of the game's setting. Let's face it, it's probably the song.

4. Persona 4

A murder-mystery about truths both grand and personal. It's one of the most intimate games ever, introducing you to an immediately endearing cast and examining every layer of their psyches.

3. Ikaruga

Ikaruga made me realize that "video-gamey" games could still tell layered, resonant stories. It's a twenty minute long shmup with no text outside of chapter titles (at least in the GameCube version), with razor-sharp level design and the smartest approach to shooting in the genre. It also serves as a lovely little reincarnation allegory that only gets more moving the more you stew on it. It's an eternal videogame.

2. Silent Hill 2

This game was the first time I seriously engaged with subtext and what a story has to say. It's a beautiful experience, one that still resonates with me deeply.

1. Breath of Fire: Dragon Quarter

Perfect and holistic. As self-assured in its design as games like Ikaruga and Tetris. One of the best games I’ve ever played, and one of my favorite stories.

(I haven't played any of the other Breath of Fire games, but seeing as their fans tend to hate Dragon Quarter I probably never will wholly out of spite.)

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